WRITTEN BY: Scott Figlie
May 05, 2021

Category:

Summary

– Whether you’re just starting out―or starting again―this workout routine for beginners will help you drastically improve your physique and fitness levels.

– The first two weeks are to practice your form, so the weight should be light. Do additional sets if you want to keep rehearsing the motion, but treat them as “practice.”

– The second two weeks, you’ll add another set. Start with a light warm-up set, then choose a slightly heavier weight for each of your next 2 sets. You should approach muscle failure by the target rep listed. Don’t sacrifice good form to do more reps if the weight is too heavy.

– You can repeat this workout for up to 8 weeks, make sure you choose a more challenging weight for your second and third sets. Try to choose a weight that you can just reach the target rep with; if you can do more reps, the weight is too light, and if you can’t reach the target rep, the weight is too heavy. For better results, try adding a RPM Speed Rope to your workout routine.

– As you get stronger over the course of the program, do more reps and/or increase the weight to progressively challenge the working muscles.

Summary

– Whether you’re just starting out―or starting again―this workout routine for beginners will help you drastically improve your physique and fitness levels.

– The first two weeks are to practice your form, so the weight should be light. Do additional sets if you want to keep rehearsing the motion, but treat them as “practice.”

– The second two weeks, you’ll add another set. Start with a light warm-up set, then choose a slightly heavier weight for each of your next 2 sets. You should approach muscle failure by the target rep listed. Don’t sacrifice good form to do more reps if the weight is too heavy.

– You can repeat this workout for up to 8 weeks, make sure you choose a more challenging weight for your second and third sets. Try to choose a weight that you can just reach the target rep with; if you can do more reps, the weight is too light, and if you can’t reach the target rep, the weight is too heavy. For better results, try adding a RPM Speed Rope to your workout routine.

– As you get stronger over the course of the program, do more reps and/or increase the weight to progressively challenge the working muscles.

The perfect workout routine for beginners 

The perfect workout routine for beginners 

workout routine beginners MXT

Discover a revolutionary workout routine with the beginner in mind. No one is born with six-pack abs, and no one came into this world lifting a 100-kilogram bench press. Every incredible physique is built out of a desire for self-improvement and a willingness to work hard and learn the correct way to do things.

Some people step into the gym with the intention of getting fitter, but without knowing what to do. They often end up doing any and every exercise in the gym every single day, and hoping that something happens.

And something usually does happen: They usually quit after about a month because nothing’s happened. Your routine mustn’t be too complicated to prevent injury or boredom. If those past mistakes sound like something you can relate to, I recommend that you stick around. Here’s the info you need to get started once for all.

Discover a revolutionary workout routine with the beginner in mind. No one is born with six-pack abs, and no one came into this world lifting a 100-kilogram bench press. Every incredible physique is built out of a desire for self-improvement and a willingness to work hard and learn the correct way to do things.

Some people step into the gym with the intention of getting fitter, but without knowing what to do. They often end up doing any and every exercise in the gym every single day, and hoping that something happens.

And something usually does happen: They usually quit after about a month because nothing’s happened. Your routine mustn’t be too complicated to prevent injury or boredom. If those past mistakes sound like something you can relate to, I recommend that you stick around. Here’s the info you need to get started once for all.

Why this program works

Why this program works

1. It Trains the Major Muscle Groups

Focusing on a different workout routine every day, but always focusing on the major muscle groups—chest, back, shoulders, quads, glutes, hamstrings, biceps, triceps, and even smaller muscle groups like the forearms, calves, and abs—allows you to build a symmetrical physique. It also helps you get stronger overall, which will help with every muscle group over time.

This complete training also helps avoid drastic muscular imbalances that can arise when you consistently favor some body parts over others. Imbalances are no joke: They can lead to serious injuries.

1. It Trains the Major Muscle Groups

Focusing on a different workout routine every day, but always focusing on the major muscle groups—chest, back, shoulders, quads, glutes, hamstrings, biceps, triceps, and even smaller muscle groups like the forearms, calves, and abs—allows you to build a symmetrical physique. It also helps you get stronger overall, which will help with every muscle group over time.

This complete training also helps avoid drastic muscular imbalances that can arise when you consistently favor some body parts over others. Imbalances are no joke: They can lead to serious injuries.

2. It’s Built Around Multijoint Movements

The beginner workout routine presented here may be new to you. As a result, your coordination may feel challenged at times. If so, don’t worry. Just take a pure “practice” approach to it for the first two weeks of the program.

Multijoint and single-joint exercises are used in our workout routine for beginners. The distinction is that with multijoint exercises, two (or more) sets of joints work to accomplish the lift. With a single-joint move, only one set of joints is working.

For example, during a dumbbell bench press, action occurs at both the elbow and shoulder joints, while in a barbell curl, the movement is restricted to the elbow joint. Because more muscles are engaged when doing multijoint moves, you can use far heavier weights and elicit a stronger hormonal response in your body. They’re, therefore, better for achieving muscle and strength gains.

Don’t worry, you’ll get to do some curls, too! But consider them the dessert, not the main course.

2. It’s Built Around Multijoint Movements

The beginner workout routine presented here may be new to you. As a result, your coordination may feel challenged at times. If so, don’t worry. Just take a pure “practice” approach to it for the first two weeks of the program.

Multijoint and single-joint exercises are used in our workout routine for beginners. The distinction is that with multijoint exercises, two (or more) sets of joints work to accomplish the lift. With a single-joint move, only one set of joints is working.

For example, during a dumbbell bench press, action occurs at both the elbow and shoulder joints, while in a barbell curl, the movement is restricted to the elbow joint. Because more muscles are engaged when doing multijoint moves, you can use far heavier weights and elicit a stronger hormonal response in your body. They’re, therefore, better for achieving muscle and strength gains.

Don’t worry, you’ll get to do some curls, too! But consider them the dessert, not the main course.

3. It Features Multiple Sets of Each Exercise

Maximize your workout routine for beginners by doing 3-4 sets of a given exercise for maximum benefit. Typically, you should do a warm-up set or two of that movement before tackling more challenging weights.

3. It Features Multiple Sets of Each Exercise

Maximize your workout routine for beginners by doing 3-4 sets of a given exercise for maximum benefit. Typically, you should do a warm-up set or two of that movement before tackling more challenging weights.

4. It Uses Proven Rep Ranges for Muscle Growth

As a beginner, you’ll choose light weights so that you can do about 15 reps on each set. The last few reps should be challenging to achieve, but not so difficult that your form on the exercise gets sloppy.

As you progress, you should use even more challenging weights, ones in which you reach muscle failure by 8-12 reps with good form. If you can do more than that number—say, 15 reps—then it’s time to step up the weight. Just remember to never sacrifice form to lift a weight that’s too heavy.

4. It Uses Proven Rep Ranges for Muscle Growth

As a beginner, you’ll choose light weights so that you can do about 15 reps on each set. The last few reps should be challenging to achieve, but not so difficult that your form on the exercise gets sloppy.

As you progress, you should use even more challenging weights, ones in which you reach muscle failure by 8-12 reps with good form. If you can do more than that number—say, 15 reps—then it’s time to step up the weight. Just remember to never sacrifice form to lift a weight that’s too heavy.

5. It Gives You Just Enough Time to Rest Between Sets

Your muscles fatigue during a set. They need time to clear the lactic acid and changes in the pH that build up in the surrounding tissue. This usually takes 90-120 seconds, though larger body parts like legs and back may take longer, and smaller muscle groups like arms and calves may take less time.

A good measurement is when you catch your breath, don’t feel a strong “pump,” and feel ready to go, start a new set.

5. It Gives You Just Enough Time to Rest Between Sets

Your muscles fatigue during a set. They need time to clear the lactic acid and changes in the pH that build up in the surrounding tissue. This usually takes 90-120 seconds, though larger body parts like legs and back may take longer, and smaller muscle groups like arms and calves may take less time.

A good measurement is when you catch your breath, don’t feel a strong “pump,” and feel ready to go, start a new set.

6. It Gives You Just Enough Time to Rest Between Workouts

This is key! The lifting you do at the gym is the stimulus that begins a chain of events that causes the muscle to repair itself and make itself stronger the next time you hit the gym. That takes time, nutrients, and rest. Clearly, then, you can’t train too often, and dismissing good nutritional habits and shortchanging your rest will be counterproductive to your muscle gains.

In terms of training frequency, don’t hit a given muscle group intensely more frequently than once every 48 hours. As you become more advanced and add volume, you may even want to increase that rest period.

If you want a boost to your recovery routine, you might consider adding a portable massage gun to your regular routine.

6. It Gives You Just Enough Time to Rest Between Workouts

This is key! The lifting you do at the gym is the stimulus that begins a chain of events that causes the muscle to repair itself and make itself stronger the next time you hit the gym. That takes time, nutrients, and rest. Clearly, then, you can’t train too often, and dismissing good nutritional habits and shortchanging your rest will be counterproductive to your muscle gains.

In terms of training frequency, don’t hit a given muscle group intensely more frequently than once every 48 hours. As you become more advanced and add volume, you may even want to increase that rest period.

If you want a boost to your recovery routine, you might consider adding a portable massage gun to your regular routine.

7.It Burns Fat While Building Muscle

You’ll find some people online claiming you can’t burn fat and build muscle at the same time. Don’t believe them! When you’re a beginner in the weight room, you can absolutely do both—and especially when you’re doing full-body workouts.

Full-body training has been shown to burn fat more effectively than workouts that are focused on specific body parts. Work hard on these movements, and you’ll definitely be sweating!

And introducing the powerful stimulus of strength training will help replace some of the fat you’re burning with muscle. This process is known as “recomposition.” No, the scale may not go down as quickly as if you were purely focusing on fat loss, but the scale doesn’t tell the whole story. Simply focus on doing each workout to the best of your ability, and trust the process!

7.It Burns Fat While Building Muscle

You’ll find some people online claiming you can’t burn fat and build muscle at the same time. Don’t believe them! When you’re a beginner in the weight room, you can absolutely do both—and especially when you’re doing full-body workouts.

Full-body training has been shown to burn fat more effectively than workouts that are focused on specific body parts. Work hard on these movements, and you’ll definitely be sweating!

And introducing the powerful stimulus of strength training will help replace some of the fat you’re burning with muscle. This process is known as “recomposition.” No, the scale may not go down as quickly as if you were purely focusing on fat loss, but the scale doesn’t tell the whole story. Simply focus on doing each workout to the best of your ability, and trust the process!

8.It’s Long Enough to Give You Significant Results

As a beginner, you’ll make noticeable jumps in strength for the first two months, but typically gains start to stall when following any given program for too long. That’s when it’s time to make some larger changes in your training.

When that happens, you can change your training split by rearranging muscle groups and the number of exercises, sets, and reps on given days. You can also follow a different program that splits the training into different arrangements, like upper-body or lower-body workouts.

Manipulating all these variables keeps your training fresh and offers new challenges to overload the target muscles. This is an exciting time for beginners because there are few other times in your training career in which you’ll see jumps in strength on your basic lifts from one workout to the next.

Now go get started!

8.It’s Long Enough to Give You Significant Results

As a beginner, you’ll make noticeable jumps in strength for the first two months, but typically gains start to stall when following any given program for too long. That’s when it’s time to make some larger changes in your training.

When that happens, you can change your training split by rearranging muscle groups and the number of exercises, sets, and reps on given days. You can also follow a different program that splits the training into different arrangements, like upper-body or lower-body workouts.

Manipulating all these variables keeps your training fresh and offers new challenges to overload the target muscles. This is an exciting time for beginners because there are few other times in your training career in which you’ll see jumps in strength on your basic lifts from one workout to the next.

Now go get started!

workout routine for beginners bench press MXT

Day 1/3/5: Full Body

Flat Dumbbell Press
bench press

3 sets, 10-15 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Incline Dumbbell Row
incline dumbbell exercises

3 sets, 10-15 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Seated Should Press
seated dumbbell shoulder exercise

3 sets, 10-15 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Rope Press Down
cable rope push down

3 sets, 10-15 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Dumbbell Biceps Curl
biceps dumbbell

3 sets, 10-15 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Seated Leg Press
leg curl exercise

3 sets, 10-15 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Ab Crunch Machine
ab-crunch-exercise

3 sets, 10-15 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Day 2/4/6: Cardio

Treadmill Jogging
treadmill-jogging

Perform at a brisk but sustainable pace of around 60-65% of your maximum heart rate, 130-150 bpm for most people, for 30 min. Alternately, perform another moderate-intensity cardiovascular exercise of your choice.

1 set, 30 minutes.

Day 7: Rest Day

Rest

Rest days are just as important as exercise. In fact, a successful fitness regimen isn’t complete without rest days.

Taking regular breaks allows your body to recover and repair. It’s a critical part of progress, regardless of your fitness level or sport. Otherwise, skipping rest days can lead to overtraining or burnout.

workout routine for beginners rest day

Day 8/10/12: Full Body

Flat Dumbbell Press
bench press

3 sets, 10-15 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Incline Dumbbell Row
incline dumbbell exercises

3 sets, 10-15 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Seated Should Press
seated dumbbell shoulder exercise

3 sets, 10-15 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Rope Press Down
cable rope push down

3 sets, 10-15 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Dumbbell Biceps Curl
biceps dumbbell

3 sets, 10-15 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Seated Leg Press
leg curl exercise

3 sets, 10-15 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Ab Crunch Machine
ab-crunch-exercise

3 sets, 10-15 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Day 9/11/13: Cardio

Treadmill Jogging
treadmill-jogging

Perform at a brisk but sustainable pace of around 60-65% of your maximum heart rate, 130-150 bpm for most people, for 30 min. Alternately, perform another moderate-intensity cardiovascular exercise of your choice.

1 set, 30 minutes.

Day 14: Rest Day

Rest

Rest days are just as important as exercise. In fact, a successful fitness regimen isn’t complete without rest days.

Taking regular breaks allows your body to recover and repair. It’s a critical part of progress, regardless of your fitness level or sport. Otherwise, skipping rest days can lead to overtraining or burnout.

couple treadmill workout routine for beginners

Day 15/17/19: Full Body

Flat Dumbbell Press
bench press

4 sets, 15, 12, 10, 8 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Incline Dumbbell Row
incline dumbbell exercises

4 sets, 15, 12, 10, 8 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Seated Should Press
seated dumbbell shoulder exercise

4 sets, 15, 12, 10, 8 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Rope Press Down
cable rope push down

4 sets, 15, 12, 10, 8 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Dumbbell Biceps Curl
biceps dumbbell

4 sets, 15, 12, 10, 8 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Seated Leg Press
leg curl exercise

4 sets, 15, 12, 10, 8 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Ab Crunch Machine
ab-crunch-exercise

4 sets, 15, 12, 10, 8 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Day 16/18/20: Cardio

Treadmill Jogging
treadmill-jogging

Perform at a brisk but sustainable pace of around 60-65% of your maximum heart rate, 130-150 bpm for most people, for 40 min. Alternately, perform another moderate-intensity cardiovascular exercise of your choice.

1 set, 40 minutes.

Day 21: Rest Day

Rest

Rest days are just as important as exercise. In fact, a successful fitness regimen isn’t complete without rest days.

Taking regular breaks allows your body to recover and repair. It’s a critical part of progress, regardless of your fitness level or sport. Otherwise, skipping rest days can lead to overtraining or burnout.

Day 22/24/26: Full Body

Flat Dumbbell Press
bench press

4 sets, 15, 12, 10, 8 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Incline Dumbbell Row
incline dumbbell exercises

4 sets, 15, 12, 10, 8 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Seated Should Press
seated dumbbell shoulder exercise

4 sets, 15, 12, 10, 8 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Rope Press Down
cable rope push down

4 sets, 15, 12, 10, 8 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Dumbbell Biceps Curl
biceps dumbbell

4 sets, 15, 12, 10, 8 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Seated Leg Press
leg curl exercise

4 sets, 15, 12, 10, 8 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Ab Crunch Machine
ab-crunch-exercise

4 sets, 15, 12, 10, 8 reps (rest 90 seconds between sets).
Use light to moderate weight and stop well short of failure.

Day 23/25/27: Cardio

Treadmill Jogging
treadmill-jogging

Perform at a brisk but sustainable pace of around 60-65% of your maximum heart rate, 130-150 bpm for most people, for 40 min. Alternately, perform another moderate-intensity cardiovascular exercise of your choice.

1 set, 40 minutes.

Day 28: Rest Day

Rest

Rest days are just as important as exercise. In fact, a successful fitness regimen isn’t complete without rest days.

Taking regular breaks allows your body to recover and repair. It’s a critical part of progress, regardless of your fitness level or sport. Otherwise, skipping rest days can lead to overtraining or burnout.

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